A traveler’s guide to Geo-targeted Advertising

A traveler's guide to Geo-targeted AdvertisingAdventure travel and geo-targeted Internet advertising have a lot in common.

Consider this definition from Wikipedia: “Adventure travel is a type of tourism, involving exploration or travel with perceived (and possibly actual) risk, and potentially requiring specialized skills and physical exertion.”

Well, maybe not the physical exertion because you’re doing the heavy lifting at your desk, but you’re certainly risking dollars with your specialized skills.

Geo-targeted display ads are the rage promoted by the major tour operators – Facebook, Twitter, LinkedIn, Google, Yahoo, Bing. They’re all clamoring for your ad dollars.

And while the Web can take your ad anywhere in the world, your campaign may not come back with the souvenirs like you hoped when you planned your adventure.

So, here are some travel tips before you set out on your journey.

Know the technology that’s being used to deliver your ad. And remember – your ad is targeted to devices, not the users and profiles of those users (more on that later).

IP-based targeting is the underlying technology – the compass – used by the search engines and social media ad programs. The limitations of IP mapping can be like magnets that throw the compass’ needle out of whack.

IP-based targeting delivers your ad to the computer’s geographic location based on the Internet Protocol address assigned by its ISP (Internet Service Provider). The IP address does not have a direct correlation to exact geography like a ZIP code. Private networks, corporate networks, rural and exurban areas (from where ISP’s reroute users to their server buildings) are just some of the intervening factors.

Travelers TipTravelers Tip: IP mapping accuracy is not 100%. The more granular you get, the less accurate it becomes so your ad will be delivered to viewers who aren’t in the territory. It’s pretty good down to the City/Metropolitan area level. It’s offered at the zip code level, but approach cautiously.

A/B test until you get it right. For example, bundle a few neighboring zip codes rather than using just one or expand/contract the radius around your center point.

Mobile or Location-based targeting is the other underlying technology, but despite the huge gains in mobile access by users, it has not gained traction with the advertising programs offered by search engines and social networks.

Mobile or Location-based targeting gets its geographic information in one of two ways: Confirmed or Derived. Confirmed location targeting depends on the user turning on the device’s GPS capabilities or when the user “checks in” at a location. Derived relies on inferences such as tri-angulation of cell towers and mapped Wi-Fi hot spots.

IP-base targeting to devices is much less sophisticated than targeting actual users that fit an actual profile of your target audience. Since search engines and social networks don’t maintain the depth of user information to support user profile-based advertising, IP targeting works for them.

Travelers TipTravelers Tip: IP-based geo-targeting is a good way to get your campaign into the general area for most of your audience, but it’s not a precise map to the pot of gold at the end of the rainbow. You need to include other targeting factors when planning your campaign.

So user information comes into play. You need to know who are you targeting.

The search engines and social networks aggregate their data and also apply some analytics to create modifiers to refine the Geo-targeting for better ROI. Google, for example, uses the search histories of their users. Facebook uses Profile information and aggregates information on users’ friends to better define the individual.

User-profile based targeting is highly effective for hyper-targeted campaigns because the profiles have much more direct 1st party online data that have been gathered from multiple sources. All kinds of behavioral and shopping history data are in each profile. Geographic information – both IP and Location-based – are just a couple of the hundreds of attributes within each profile. This allows the data managers to create very specific campaign Audiences from millions of profiles with hundreds of attributes on each profile.

Geo-targeting and User profile targeting can both lead to great campaigns. Like travel plans, your campaigns cost thousands of dollars. Plan your budget to try both, and scale up what works best over time.

Happy Trails…

Want to hit more targets? Aim better with hyper-targeting.

Hyper-target to find your prospects

OK, so you’re targeting your direct mail, print, and local broadcast by zip codes or subscribers to magazines or newspaper readership or cable channel zones. That’s what you – and most other small and medium size businesses (SMB’s) – have done for decades to generate traffic and awareness that your doors are open.

The problem is that you know it’s so 20th Century and you have a sense about moving into the Digital Age, but you’re not sure where to begin.

Start with what you know: good marketing still means getting the right message in front of the right audience. Internet marketing offers clear alternatives to some of the massive dollars still being spent on direct mail, print and local broadcast.

With Internet advertising, your ad dollars are spent more efficiently by reaching more precise targets.

First and foremost, recognize that the Internet can gather better targeting information than the static traditional methods. Digital data is so widespread in our lives that it’s coined the term Big Data because of the volume, variety, and the velocity at which it’s generated.

Secondly, the best targeting begins with 100’s of millions of individual data profiles. The more characteristics/data points in each profile, the more precisely profiles can be selected and aggregated into targeted audiences with the means of reaching them based on their histories of where they go online.

The data is gathered from sources like your online registrations, cookies, and click/visit activities, plus what’s compiled from social platforms, blogs, sharing sites, Tweets, retail apps – even those cards you swipe at check-out for discounts – are analyzed and modeled for aggregation into very large hyper-targeted audience files for online display advertisers.

These huge troves of data are much more extensive than what search engines like Google or Bing can gather from user search histories. Search Engine Optimization/Search Engine Marketing is effective for reaching audience members that are specifically seeking something at the time, but that only scratches the surface of targeting.

Data-driven Online Display Marketing allows advertisers to create campaigns that serve their ads to large audiences, where and when the users that meet their customer profile will most likely see it.

The two strongest types of targeting are Behavioral Targeting and Contextual Targeting.

Behavioral Targeting uses profile information that is based on an individual user’s viewing behavior to target ads specific to their interests.

Contextual Targeting serves advertising messages based on content being viewed on an individual Web page. Contextual targeting can often be hyper-targeted geographically (Zip code, neighborhoods, cities…) because the content is often of a local context. Contextual targeting based on the Web page being viewed is also an excellent means for real-time targeting based on the viewer’s interests; e.g., vacation, sports, health and wellness…

If your advertising spend on print, direct mail, TV and cable is 10’s of thousands of dollars annually, you owe it to yourself to move some of those dollars into Internet display. Then you’ll have a mix of marketing channels that blends the new with the old.

Navigating Internet advertising

6x4-300-ppi-Navigating-Internet-advertising

By Earl Starkoff, MarketServ™

Spend money to advertise to promote sales. Seems pretty basic – whether your message is delivered in print or online.

For most small and medium (SMB) businesses, however, advertising online is like navigating uncharted waters. Most are still staying in their safe havens casting about for sales by spending most of their hard-earned dollars in direct mail, magazines, and newspapers – and too little online where their prospects live their daily lives.

And they’re leaving the online opportunities to the Big Brands.

It’s time for the SMB’s to weigh anchor, and spend more of their time and money out where they can catch more fish.

The two well-charted marketing channels for angling online for new business are Search Engine Optimization and Display. Both use targeting that focuses on their prospects’ online activity.

First priority: recognize that you have to be properly outfitted. Search Engine Optimization and Display require spending real dollars – just like your print campaigns – so you have the right gear, go to the right space, and commit to a fishing trip or expedition, not a day cruise on the water with some nice gear.

Search Engine Optimization (SEO) puts your line in crowded places like the Google Gulfstream or Bing Bay with lots of other fishermen. Search engines are where hungry, ready-to-bite prospects are looking at lures. It’s called “optimization” because your dollars are used to angle your way to the top of page one of a search. That way, you avoid getting tangled with all of other lines.

From there, you’ve got your best chance to hook the fish. With SEO, you’re line fishing for single catches – the more, the better.

Display advertising puts you out on the open waters where all the fish live. You set your course with companies that hold vast data files of user online action and behavior files to target your ads to just the prospects you want when they’re online.

It’s fishing on a much bigger scale than SEO. You’re going from single line fishing to using the Net (literally, sorry) to catch your customers.

By scale, think of your net as your ad campaign. Lots of fish will swim past your net and never click to your web site, but – like commercial net fishing – it’s not a matter of the ones that got away. There are so many more, you’ll catch plenty.

Display advertising requires time, patience, and scale. You can’t just buy a few display ad spots on a search engine, show it to a limited audience, and expect to land much – if anything. That’s single line fishing in sparse waters.

Which is best? Only results will tell. Like the Big Brands, a combination is the way to go for most businesses.

Watch your Bottom Line Metrics, and chart the course that keeps your business sailing along.